AIRCRAFT SHOWCASE

A-7

VOUGHT A-7D "CORSAIR II"

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VOUGHT A-7D Corsair II

The U.S. Air Force adopted the LTV A-7D on December 23, 1968, and 645 were placed on order. It was developed as a single-seat subsonic tactical fighter designed to deliver a weapon load with pinpoint accuracy. Originally designed for the U.S. Navy, the prototype made its first flight on September 27, 1965, at Dallas, Texas. The USAF A-7D began to arrive at Korat Air Base, Thailand, during the late summer of 1972. By the end of October 1972, the A-7D had taken over the combat close air support (SANDY) mission from the Douglas A-1E “Skyraider” attack aircraft. During operations in Southeast Asia, A-7s flew more than 100,000 sorties and earned the respect of all who flew them. In the late 1970s, the A-7 was delivered in significant numbers to U.S. Air National Guard units where further improvements on weapons systems incorporated the “Pave Penny” laser target designation pod and the addition of advanced maneuvering flaps. The last model series of the A-7, affectionately known as the SLUF (“Short Little Ugly Fella”), was the A-7K two-seat strike trainer. All A-7s were decommissioned from the USAF inventory in 1992.

The A-7D (s/n 71-337) on display is painted to represent the 23rd Tactical Fighter Wing, USAF, England AFB, Louisiana from the late 1970s.

This aircraft is on loan from the National Air Force Museum.

TECHNICAL NOTES:

Wingspan: 38.7 ft.
Height: 16.1 ft.
Length: 46.1 ft.
Weight (maximum): 42,000 lbs
Armament: One 20-mm M061A-1 cannon and up to 15,000 lbs of mixed ordnance.
Engine: One Allison TF41-A-1 turbofan rated at 14,250 lbs of thrust.
Crew: One
Manufacturer: Ling-Temco-Vought, Incorporated.
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